College Lacrosse Recruiting: “5 Essential Steps For College Recruits” By Tom Kovic


5 Essential Steps for College Recruits

By Tom Kovic

If you’re an athlete being recruited by colleges, the process can be stressful and choosing the right school can be difficult. Not only do you have to like the school, but the school has to like you. It may sound simple, but finding the perfect situation can be elusive. Luckily, there are ways to reduce the stress and increase the ease of the recruiting process. Here are 5 essential recruiting steps to help you with your college search.

1. Determine Potential Fits

Everyone has an idea of his or her perfect college experience. Identifying what you’re looking for in a school should be one of your first steps. Self-awareness is a powerful tool, and determining what most appeals to you about the college experience is critically important. Meet with your family to list your criteria—e.g., academic strength, level of athleticism, geographic location, size of undergraduate population. This will help you create your initial college list.

Research a small but equal number of D-I, II and III colleges and their sports programs. Read about each team’s level of success and dig into a few player profiles to evaluate their level of skill and athleticism. Take into account the school’s conference and the strength of their schedule. Finding the right class of competition for your skill level will lead to a more fulfilling college experience.

2. Identify Your Position of Strength

Do you want to use your strength as an athlete to gain an athletic scholarship, or do you want to leverage your athletic ability to get accepted to an academically select institution?

Just over 25 percent of college athletes qualify for athletic scholarships, and the competition is fierce. College coaches use simple strategies when recruiting prospects, and scholarship athletes are typically immediate impact, blue-chip players.

Coaches from certain conferences or divisions (such as the Ivy League) use slightly different formulas for rating potential prospects. The evaluation begins in the classroom, not on the field. Those schools seek academic information (such as transcripts, high school profiles and standardized test scores) to help them compute a rough “admissions index.” Once prospects pass this hurdle, coaches aggressively begin their athletic evaluation.

RELATED: Increase Your Value as a College Recruit

3. Know the NCAA Rules and Procedures

Understand and embrace the NCAA’s recruiting rules. Visit the NCAA Resources page to preview the recruiting manuals for each division and devote time to the chapters on recruiting, eligibility and financial aid.

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Your high school athletic director can provide you with an easy-to-understand, scaled-down version of the NCAA rules. He or she should also have experience working with former high school athletes who went on to play in college, so feel free to lean on your AD as a resource for information and insight.

RELATED: 8 Ways NCAA Recruiting Rules Have Changed

4. See the Big Picture

Your athletic career is only one part of a broader collegiate experience. It’s important to look beyond athletics when assessing schools that can prepare you for your professional field of interest.

Some “non-athletic-scholarship schools” can, in many cases, still offer significant financial assistance. It’s important for you, your family and your high school advisors to clearly understand the role of the college coach in this process and make every effort to develop a sincere and strong working relationship with him or her.

5. Communicate

Once you identify the colleges you are interested in, make an effort to communicate with the right people as early as possible. College coaches have clear restrictions to when and where they may contact recruits and their families, but you and your family may call or email a coach early in the recruiting process, with very few exceptions.

Sending a letter of introduction accompanied by a profile is a great way to begin, but it’s important to follow up regularly with significant updates that have “grip,” such as competition results, statistics and academic updates. If you practice “proactive persistence” with respect, you can a grab a college coach’s attention.

Learn more about how to maximize your communication with college coaches.

http://www.stack.com/2014/08/22/college-recruit-steps/?icn=homepage&ici=Latest_1%20newsletter

Denver Outlaws Top Rochester Rattlers 12-11 To Claim 2014 MLL Championship; 6-1 Fourth Quarter Run Earns Team First Title In Nine Seasons


The Denver Outlaws outscored the Rochester Rattlers 6-1 in the fourth quarter to win the franchise’s first MLL Championship. Drew Snider scored the game-winning goal with 56 seconds left in the game, to seal the 12-11 victory for the team and earn them the Steinfeld Trophy. It was Denver’s fifth MLL Championship appearance in nine years as a franchise. The Outlaws are the only MLL franchise to make the playoffs in each year of existence. John Grant Jr. was named the Coca Cola Championship Final MVP for his three-goal, four-point performance tonight. Chris Bocklet started the scoring, netting a goal 19 seconds into the first quarter—the quickest goal in MLL Championship history since 2005, the earliest year statistical information was available for. The Rattlers answered with five straight goals to close out the first quarter, and took a 5-1 lead into the second. Domenic Sebastiani ended the scoring drought for Denver, to cut the Rochester lead to 5-2 early in the second quarter. Denver capitalized on a man-up opportunity after Rochester’s John Lade was called for pushing, as Bocklet netted his second goal of the night. Junior continued the scoring for Denver, working the crease to sneak one by Rochester goalie John Galloway and cutting the Rochester lead to 6-4 heading into halftime. Faceoff specialist Anthony Kelly was 8-12 (.667) in the first half, playing despite injuring his Achilles and missing the last two games before playoffs. He finished the game 14-25 (.560) on faceoffs. Rochester scored two in the third to extend its lead to 8-4. Eric Law worked the crease, showing off some Junior-like moves, to net his first goal of the night and make it 8-5. Rochester answered with a goal of their own, but Sieverts found net to make it 9-6. Rochester added one more to end the third quarter and take a 10-6 lead into the final quarter of play. Junior netted two goals early in the fourth, including his signature behind-the-back move, to cut Rochester’s lead to 10-8. On the team’s next offensive possession, Junior dished it off to Law in front of the goal for the team’s third goal in a row, to make it 10-9—the narrowest Rochester lead since early in the first quarter.

The Denver Outlaws outscored the Rochester Rattlers 6-1 in the fourth quarter to win the franchise’s first MLL Championship. Drew Snider scored the game-winning goal with 56 seconds left in the game, to seal the 12-11 victory for the team and earn them the Steinfeld Trophy.
It was Denver’s fifth MLL Championship appearance in nine years as a franchise. The Outlaws are the only MLL franchise to make the playoffs in each year of existence.
John Grant Jr. was named the Coca Cola Championship Final MVP for his three-goal, four-point performance tonight.
Chris Bocklet started the scoring, netting a goal 19 seconds into the first quarter—the quickest goal in MLL Championship history since 2005, the earliest year statistical information was available for.
The Rattlers answered with five straight goals to close out the first quarter, and took a 5-1 lead into the second.
Domenic Sebastiani ended the scoring drought for Denver, to cut the Rochester lead to 5-2 early in the second quarter. Denver capitalized on a man-up opportunity after Rochester’s John Lade was called for pushing, as Bocklet netted his second goal of the night.
Junior continued the scoring for Denver, working the crease to sneak one by Rochester goalie John Galloway and cutting the Rochester lead to 6-4 heading into halftime.
Faceoff specialist Anthony Kelly was 8-12 (.667) in the first half, playing despite injuring his Achilles and missing the last two games before playoffs. He finished the game 14-25 (.560) on faceoffs.
Rochester scored two in the third to extend its lead to 8-4. Eric Law worked the crease, showing off some Junior-like moves, to net his first goal of the night and make it 8-5. Rochester answered with a goal of their own, but Sieverts found net to make it 9-6. Rochester added one more to end the third quarter and take a 10-6 lead into the final quarter of play.
Junior netted two goals early in the fourth, including his signature behind-the-back move, to cut Rochester’s lead to 10-8. On the team’s next offensive possession, Junior dished it off to Law in front of the goal for the team’s third goal in a row, to make it 10-9—the narrowest Rochester lead since early in the first quarter.

Denver Outlaws Face Rochester Rattlers In 2014 MLL Championship Game On Aug 23; Look To Win First Title In 9 Years In Rematch 2008 Final


The Outlaws and the Rattlers will face each other in the final competition of the season to see who will take home the Steinfeld Trophy at the 2014 MLL Championship. Last Time Out: In a back and forth game, the Outlaws managed to edge the New York Lizards out of the playoffs with a 14-13 win in the semifinals in Denver last weekend. The Ohio Machine was also ousted as the Rattlers made an incredible comeback to defeat the Machine 15-11 in Rochester. Three Storylines: Flash Back: Since both the Outlaws and the Rattlers have been around, the teams have met a total of ten times between the regular season and playoffs.  If you’re looking to their competitive history for a peak into the future, their record will only add to the anticipation. The teams are 5-5 in all competitions when it comes to victories playing each other. While the teams have an even overall record, fans who remember the championship game of 2008 know that Denver has some redeeming to do.  The last time the two teams saw each other in the final battle of the season, the Rattlers defeated Denver in a 16-6 blowout.  Will Denver fail again, or will the tables turn on Rochester? Break The Curse: It is no surprise that the Outlaws have found themselves in the playoffs this year. They have made it to the post season each of the nine years the team has been in the league. Despite four semi-final and four final game appearances, the Outlaws have never won a championship. Maybe this will be their year. The Magic Touch: Denver’s coach B.J. O’Hara has a chance to become the only MLL head coach to win championships with two separate teams. O’Hara won his first season title coaching the Rattlers when they defeated the Outlaws in 2008. If Denver can capture the Steinfeld Trophy this weekend, perhaps it is O’Hara who has the magic touch.

The Outlaws and the Rattlers will face each other in the final competition of the season to see who will take home the Steinfeld Trophy at the 2014 MLL Championship.
Last Time Out:
In a back and forth game, the Outlaws managed to edge the New York Lizards out of the playoffs with a 14-13 win in the semifinals in Denver last weekend. The Ohio Machine was also ousted as the Rattlers made an incredible comeback to defeat the Machine 15-11 in Rochester.
Three Storylines:
Flash Back: Since both the Outlaws and the Rattlers have been around, the teams have met a total of ten times between the regular season and playoffs. If you’re looking to their competitive history for a peak into the future, their record will only add to the anticipation. The teams are 5-5 in all competitions when it comes to victories playing each other. While the teams have an even overall record, fans who remember the championship game of 2008 know that Denver has some redeeming to do. The last time the two teams saw each other in the final battle of the season, the Rattlers defeated Denver in a 16-6 blowout. Will Denver fail again, or will the tables turn on Rochester?
Break The Curse: It is no surprise that the Outlaws have found themselves in the playoffs this year. They have made it to the post season each of the nine years the team has been in the league. Despite four semi-final and four final game appearances, the Outlaws have never won a championship. Maybe this will be their year.
The Magic Touch: Denver’s coach B.J. O’Hara has a chance to become the only MLL head coach to win championships with two separate teams. O’Hara won his first season title coaching the Rattlers when they defeated the Outlaws in 2008. If Denver can capture the Steinfeld Trophy this weekend, perhaps it is O’Hara who has the magic touch.

Lacrosse Magazine September 2014 Issue Released Featuring Team Uganda And Full Coverage And Reporting At The FIL World Championships


Lacrosse Magazine Sept 2014 Issue

A month after capturing hearts and making history at the Federation of International Lacrosse (FIL) World Championship, Africa’s first national lacrosse team has landed on the cover of Lacrosse Magazine. The September edition of LM, which hits mailboxes next week, features Team Uganda captain Patrick “Pato” Oriana, goalie Allan Amone and defenseman Ronald Otim in a portrait staged by photographer Trevor Brown at the team’s University of Denver dorm. The cover adorns a special edition with 20 pages of world championship coverage, including more vivid photography and behind-the-scenes reporting with Team Uganda, Team USA and gold medal-winning Team Canada. Just three years after the first sanctioned lacrosse game in Africa, Uganda overcame financial, political and cultural obstacles to get to Denver, where the team’s story caught fire. Eight of the players come from the northern region of Uganda that was terrorized by the Joseph Kony-led Lord’s Resistance Army during the mid-1990s and early 2000s. Many come from poverty. Some, like Castro David Onen, sacrificed their jobs to play for Team Uganda. “In case of anything, I can pick up and finish my school,” Onen said. “If nothing, I hope to spread the word of lacrosse in Africa. Onen, a baker, scored in every game for Uganda, including the first goal in team history in its FIL opener against Ireland. He also scored the first goal in the first King’s Cup in 2011 in Kampala, Uganda. “I scored the first goal in Africa. I’m very glad to come to America, another continent, in the world games of lacrosse, and to score again the first goal,” Onen said. “It’s a moment I will remember for a long time.” Uganda’s debut was a moment the lacrosse world will remember forever.

Cal Berkeley Women’s Lacrosse Names Brooke Eubanks As Head Coach; Long-Time Stanford Assistant Coach & Canadian National Team Player


Brooke Eubanks, a long-time assistant coach at Stanford who won multiple medals as a player for the Canadian Senior National Team, has been named head coach for women’s lacrosse at the University of California, Berkeley. “Lacrosse is my passion,” Eubanks said. “It's the game I love to play and the game I love to coach. Being fortunate enough to play lacrosse in college and in three World Cups was too short-lived. I knew early on that I wanted to be a head coach and continue enjoying this great sport. I can't imagine a better place, a better university or a better time to be a head coach than right now at Cal. I am thrilled for this opportunity, and I promise not to disappoint.”

Brooke Eubanks, a long-time assistant coach at Stanford who won multiple medals as a player for the Canadian Senior National Team, has been named head coach for women’s lacrosse at the University of California, Berkeley.
“Lacrosse is my passion,” Eubanks said. “It’s the game I love to play and the game I love to coach. Being fortunate enough to play lacrosse in college and in three World Cups was too short-lived. I knew early on that I wanted to be a head coach and continue enjoying this great sport. I can’t imagine a better place, a better university or a better time to be a head coach than right now at Cal. I am thrilled for this opportunity, and I promise not to disappoint.”

During her time at Stanford, Eubanks served as the team’s offensive coordinator and recruiting coordinator with responsibilities such as in-game play calling, scouting opponents and coordinating practices. With her help, the Cardinal won four Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF) championships, garnered multiple national top-10 rankings, set a school record for the most wins in a season in program history (16, 2011) and produced four MPSF Players of the Year and one MPSF Rookie of the Year. In addition, Stanford earned IWLCA Division I Merit Squad recognition in 2011.

“Brooke has demonstrated a commitment to high achievement on the field and in the classroom for more than a decade as both a player and a coach at the collegiate level, and I believe that she will be a wonderful fit for our lacrosse program, our department and our university,” said Interim Director of Athletics Mike Williams. “Brooke brings a passion for lacrosse as well as a desire to create a strong team culture and positive atmosphere that should clearly benefit our student-athletes. I am excited to welcome her to Cal.”

Prior to her tenure at Stanford, Eubanks was an assistant coach at George Mason from 2006-08. During that span, George Mason collected the school record for wins in a season (12, 2008) and garnered the team’s highest national ranking in school history at No. 9. Eubanks served under current Stanford head coach Amy Bokker at both Stanford and George Mason.

“We’re very happy for Brooke in taking the next step in her coaching career,” Bokker said. “Brooke has been a dedicated part of Stanford Lacrosse. I certainly appreciate all she has done to help build the program. Now, she is prepared and ready to lead her own. Cal is getting a quality coach and person and we wish her the best.”

As a player, Eubanks was a member of the Canadian Senior National Team from 2003-13, playing in three World Cups. Canada won the silver medal in 2013, with Eubanks serving as team captain. She was second on her team in scoring in the 2009 World Cup, helping the Canadians capture the bronze medal.

Eubanks enjoyed a successful collegiate career at James Madison from 2002-06 where she was a four-year starter and led the squad to three Colonial Athletic Association championships. The Patriots advanced to the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament in 2004 and ’06. Individually, Eubanks was an all-conference second-team selection and a member of the CAA all-tournament team in both 2005 and ’06. She was also named to the 2006 Virginia Sports Information Directors’ Association All-State Team.

Raised in Englewood, Colo., Eubanks is the daughter of 1980 Pittsburgh Penguin NHL draft pick Steve McKenzie and was born in Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Canada, while her father was playing minor-league hockey there.

Brooke and her husband, Eric, have a daughter, Olive.

Team Canada Men Defeat USA 8-5 To Win 2014 FIL World Lacrosse Championship; Earns Third Title With Ball Control And Dominant Defensive Effort


The consensus among fans and analysts heading into Saturday’s Federation of International Lacrosse World Championship final between Canada and the United states was that the Americans, dominant all tournament long, were the clear-cut favorites.  Canada, seeking its first gold since 2006, needed to win faceoffs and control possession to keep the ball away from Team USA’s stacked offense, which came into the championship game averaging 17.83 goals per game and winning 80 percent of its faceoffs.

The consensus among fans and analysts heading into Saturday’s Federation of International Lacrosse World Championship final between Canada and the United states was that the Americans, dominant all tournament long, were the clear-cut favorites.
Canada, seeking its first gold since 2006, needed to win faceoffs and control possession to keep the ball away from Team USA’s stacked offense, which came into the championship game averaging 17.83 goals per game and winning 80 percent of its faceoffs.

It wasn’t pretty, and the announced 11,861 at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park booed Canada in the second half as the team milked a lead that swelled to 8-2 early in the fourth quarter. But it worked. Canada earned just its third world championship Saturday with a shocking 8-5 win.

Despite an attack-driven offense led throughout the tournament by leading scorers Curtis Dickson, Mark Matthews and Adam Jones, it was Canada’s midfield that stepped up in the final. Canada midfielder Kevin Crowley, a Chesapeake Bayhawk who came into the game with three goals in six games, scored five times, and midfielder Jordan Hall, who had just one assist in the tournament, finished with two assists.

Veteran faceoff specialist Geoff Snider, the hero of Canada’s surprise 2006 gold medal in London, Ontario, helped the Canadians to a 35-22 ground-ball advantage and limited Team USA’s duo of Greg Gurenlian and Chris Eck, who went 7-for-14 on the night.

The U.S. offense went cold against Canada. It managed just 30 shots — nearly 20 below its tournament average — against goalkeeper Dillon Ward (10 saves), who played well en route to Most Valuable Player honors. A late three-goal run by Team USA cut Canada’s lead to 8-5 with 6:24 remaining in the fourth quarter, firing up the crowd and generating some loud “U-S-A” chants, but it couldn’t get them all the way back. A goal by Canada’s Wesley Berg with 5:01 left was called off, but the United States couldn’t sustain its momentum and did not score again.

Kevin Leveille led the United States with a hat trick, while dangerous midfielders Paul Rabil (Johns Hopkins) and Dave Lawson, who had combined for 42 points entering the final, failed to register a goal or an assist. Rob Pannell had a goal and three assists for the Americans.

The game started slowly, with Canada taking a 2-0 lead after the first quarter on two goals by Crawley. Neither team made much progress in the second quarter, either, and the Canadians took a 3-1 lead into halftime. But just as Team Canada showed against the Iroquois Nation in its 12-6 semifinal win Thursday night, it was an overwhelming third quarter that proved most crucial.

This was the fifth straight time the United States and Canada have played in the gold-medal game, with the Americans winning the last world championship, in 2010, behind MVP Rabil.

For more:  http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2014-07-19/sports/bal-canada-united-states-usa-world-lacrosse-championship-8-5-20140719_1_team-canada-world-lacrosse-championship-championship-game

Team USA Dominates Iroquois Nationals 18-5 At World Championships; Earn #1 Seed In Semifinals


Team USA head coach Richie Meade gathered his group after its 18-5 dismantling of the Iroquois Nationals and said, "That's the way we want to play." Start with the faceoffs, and work your way around the field: the U.S. defense squashed the Thompson-led offense, goalie Jesse Schwartzman made timely stops, two-way midfielders controlled possession and the offense lit it up, with Rob Pannell and Paul Rabil combining for 10 goals and four assists.

Team USA head coach Richie Meade gathered his group after its 18-5 dismantling of the Iroquois Nationals and said, “That’s the way we want to play.”
Start with the faceoffs, and work your way around the field: the U.S. defense squashed the Thompson-led offense, goalie Jesse Schwartzman made timely stops, two-way midfielders controlled possession and the offense lit it up, with Rob Pannell and Paul Rabil combining for 10 goals and four assists.

And yet still, when the post-game huddle broke, U.S. assistant coach Dave Pietramala made sure to remind everyone, “We can be better.” Really?

Pietramala’s defense was well-prepared and executed. Close defenseman Tucker Durkin marked Lyle Thompson, as he did when the pair matched up against each other in college, and limited him to two assists. Michael Evans held Miles Thompson in check (three goals) and Lee Zink blanked crease attackman Cody Jamieson and rising Syracuse senior Randy Staats when he moved down to attack from midfield where he started the game. Staats also drew the pole of Kyle Hartzell when he played midfield.

Durkin used a tough punch check to harass Thompson throughout the tilt, and got plenty of support from roamers looking to close in if the ball appeared in a stick longer than a couple seconds. The Iroquois ended up taking fewer shots (14) than the U.S. scored goals. Pannell outscored the Nationals by two goals on his own.

“We knew a lot of their dodgers are very good at keeping the ball in their stick,” Durkin said. “We wanted to make sure when we doubled, we came in hard and we made sure to try to get the ball on the ground. The biggest thing for us was protecting inside, they are so good at hitting cutters backside, inside, through the defense. We wanted to protect the interior of the defense. We thought that was crucial.”

The U.S. didn’t watch any tape of past Johns Hopkins-Albany games in its “bunker,” its converted common-room space in the dorms at Denver University, where the group meets before doing generally anything, including breaking down film. But they did watch the last couple Iroquois games here, with Lyle Thompson shifted to attack.